Archive for ‘osx Server’ Category

Once you’ve purchased Mountain Lion from the App Store, follow these steps to create a backup install DVD or flash drive

  1. Download Lion from the Mac App Store—but don’t install it yet, because of the disappearing installer issue noted above.
  2. Find the installer in your Applications folder and right-click on it then select “Show Package Contents.” Head to Contents and SharedSupport and look for the file called “InstallESD.dmg”
  3. Open up Disk Utility from your Applications and Utilities folder and drag the DMG file into the sidebar on the left.
  4. If you’re burning to DVD: insert your disk, select the DMG file in the sidebar, and hit “Burn.” Skip to step 6.
  5. If you’re burning to USB, you’ll need to first format the drive properly:
    • Insert the disk and select it in the sidebar in Disk Utility. Select the Partition tab, select “1 Partition” from the dropdown menu and choose “Mac OS Extended (Journaled)” for the format type.
    • Click the Options button and choose “GUID Partition Table”—this will make the drive bootable and formatted correctly for the Mac. Hit Apply to format—which will completely erase—the drive.
    • Now click the Restore tab and choose the DMG file as your source and the USB drive as the destination. Hit the Apply button to make it happen.
  6. Finally, to boot from your install disk/drive and install Mountain Lion, restart your Mac and hold the Option key down when you hear the startup chime.

That’s all….good luck :-)

SSH to your remote machine using Back to My Mac iCloud Service

datePosted on 14:14, July 27th, 2012 by Many Ayromlou

This is kinda cool. It only works if you have access to “Back to My Mac” service and you have it turned on in the remote mac’s preferences (under iCloud preferences). If you ever need to find out the FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name) of your remote mac and connect to it via ssh or something like it you can use the following command in the terminal:

echo show Setup:/Network/BackToMyMac | scutil | sed -n 's/.* : *\(.*\).$/\1/p'

This should spit out the “domain name” for your “personal” iCloud DNS. The output looks something like this:

12345678.members.btmm.icloud.com

To use this in a ssh command you would need the name of the remote machine plus the information above:

ssh -2 -6 remote-hostname.12345678.members.btmm.icloud.com

That’s it…..you should see a prompt for ssh login to your remote machine.

Turn off Parallels Promo Ads….

datePosted on 13:44, July 27th, 2012 by Many Ayromlou

This has been driving me mad ever since I started using Parallels Desktop for Mac. The damn promo screen that keeps popping up to sell me some crapware. Well here is a quick defaults command to turn it off

defaults write com.parallels.Parallels\ Desktop ProductPromo.ForcePromoOff -bool YES

Done…..Enjoy :-)

Using iCloud to sync files just like dropbox

datePosted on 13:41, November 2nd, 2011 by Many Ayromlou

If you didn’t know, iCloud has a really neat feature that allows it to act just like dropbox. If you activate the “Document & Data” synching option in the iCloud pref panel, it allows you to sync any file using iCloud. This is contrary to what Apple is selling the service as being just for “Custom” Apps that have the iCloud feature (i.e.: keynote, numbers, etc.).

So here is how you take advantage of this. Once you’ve turned on the feature in the preferences panel, you open up Finder. Hold down the “option/alt” key and from the finder menus choose “Go/Library“. This should land you in your not so secret Library directory. You need to hold down the option key to see this, since OSX Lion hides the users Library directory by default. Now in the Finder window find the “Mobile Documents” folder (and if you like) drag it to the favourites list in Finder (in the left pane). Done. Now whatever file you save into “Mobile Documents” folder from any application will “sync” with all the other mac’s you’ve setup with this feature. You can treat it like your “free” 5GB dropbox account.

Adding mcrypt support to builtin php5 on OSX Leopard….

datePosted on 17:51, February 4th, 2011 by Many Ayromlou

I got a request to add mcrypt support to our Leopard server today and here is a brief step-by-step installation instruction. This works well under the current 10.5.8 server installation. It should also work for 10.6 (snow leopard), but I have not tried it. Before you start here are the requirements:

  • Backup your system
  • Install (and update) the latest XCode (I’ve got version 3)
  • Install X11 client stuff from your server install DVD
  • install X11 SDK stuff from your server install DVD
  • Ensure you have server 10.5.8 (latest update as of Feb.04.2011)
  • Make sure you have not tried to install mcrypt using another method. We need a “virgin” 10.5.8 install (as far as homebrew/local installs)
  • BACKUP

Please note that this will add mcrypt support to php. This is NOT the same as compiling mcrypt.

Okay, so now that we have all the requirements, you need to get a command line window opened and get a root shell (sudo -i). The rest of this document assumes you’re typing the commands in a root shell.

There is one dependency that we need to clear before we actually get down and dirty and that is libmcrypt. Follow the instructions below to get this installed:

mkdir /SourceCache
cd /SourceCache
curl http://sourceforge.net/projects/mcrypt/files/Libmcrypt/2.5.8/libmcrypt-2.5.8.tar.bz2/download -o libmcrypt-2.5.8.tar.bz2 -L

This is the latest version as of this writing (Feb.04.2011).

NOTE: If you’re compiling on a G5 machine you’ll need to tell the compiler that you want to build/configure for a ppc64 target so instead of the below configure command you need to use this:

MACOSX_DEPLOYMENT_TARGET=10.5 CFLAGS=" -arch ppc64 -g -Os -pipe -no-cpp-precomp" CCFLAGS=" -arch ppc64 -g -Os -pipe" CXXFLAGS="-arch ppc64 -g -Os -pipe" LDFLAGS="-arch ppc64 -bind_at_load" ./configure --enable-shared
tar -xjvf libmcrypt-2.5.8.tar.bz2
cd libmcrypt-2.5.8/
./configure
make
make -n install

The last command will simulate the installation process. Make sure the stuff is getting installed in /usr/local/lib

make install

At this point you should have a working installation of libmcrypt. This next command prints out the current version of your php engine. In my case under 10.5.8 it’s php 5.2.14.

server:libmcrypt-2.5.8 root# php -v
PHP 5.2.14 (cli) (built: Oct  6 2010 16:57:10)
Copyright (c) 1997-2010 The PHP Group
Zend Engine v2.2.0, Copyright (c) 1998-2010 Zend Technologies

Grab the appropriate php-5.2.XX.tar.bz2 file from php.net. I just grabbed the stock PHP 5.2.14, since I wanted a perfect match between my php engine and the extension. I transferred the file using sftp to the /SourceCache folder on the server.

NOTE: If you’re compiling on a G5 machine you’ll need to tell the compiler that you want to build/configure for a ppc64 target so instead of the below configure command you need to use this:

MACOSX_DEPLOYMENT_TARGET=10.5 CFLAGS=" -arch ppc64 -g -Os -pipe -no-cpp-precomp" CCFLAGS=" -arch ppc64 -g -Os -pipe" CXXFLAGS="-arch ppc64  -g -Os -pipe" LDFLAGS=" -arch ppc64  -bind_at_load" ./configure --with-php-config=/Developer/SDKs/MacOSX10.5.sdk/usr/bin/php-config
cd /SourceCache
tar xjvf php-5.2.14.tar.bz2
cd /SourceCache/php-5.2.14/ext/mcrypt
phpize
./configure --with-php-config=/Developer/SDKs/MacOSX10.5.sdk/usr/bin/php-config
make
make test
make -n install

The last command will simulate the installation process. Make sure the stuff is getting installed in /usr/lib/php/extensions/no-debug-non-zts-20060613

make install

Now we need to modify our php.ini file and tell the php5 engine of the availability of this new module. To do this you need to copy php.ini.default to php.ini (in /etc directory). For details of why have a look at this article.

cd /etc
cp php.ini.default php.ini

Edit the newly created/copied php.ini using your favourite editor. Add the following line to the appropriate location (read the comments in the file to find the location):

extension=mcrypt.so

Still in the same file find the variable “extension_dir” and change it’s value to “/usr/lib/php/extensions/no-debug-non-zts-20060613” path instead of “./”. Save the php.ini and use the following command to see if mcrypt extensions are available:

server:etc root# php -i |grep mcrypt
mcrypt
mcrypt support => enabled
mcrypt.algorithms_dir => no value => no value
mcrypt.modes_dir => no value => no value

Done. Restart Apache service from the server manager (just for the sake of completeness).

Adding GD support to builtin php5 on OSX Leopard….

datePosted on 15:17, February 4th, 2011 by Many Ayromlou

I got a request to add GD support to our Leopard server today and here is a brief step-by-step installation instruction. This works well under the current 10.5.8 server installation. It should also work for 10.6 (snow leopard), but I have not tried it. Before you start here are the requirements:

  • Backup your system
  • Install (and update) the latest XCode (I’ve got version 3)
  • Install X11 client stuff from your server install DVD
  • install X11 SDK stuff from your server install DVD
  • Ensure you have server 10.5.8 (latest update as of Feb.04.2011)
  • Make sure you have not tried to install GD using another method. We need a “virgin” 10.5.8 install (as far as homebrew/local installs)
  • BACKUP

Please note that this will add GD support to php. This is NOT the same as compiling the GD graphics library (libgd).

Okay, so now that we have all the requirements, you need to get a command line window opened and get a root shell (sudo -i). The rest of this document assumes you’re typing the commands in a root shell.

There is one dependency that we need to clear before we actually get down and dirty and that is libjpeg (known as jpegsrc). Follow the instructions below to get this installed:

mkdir /SourceCache
cd /SourceCache
curl -O http://www.ijg.org/files/jpegsrc.v8c.tar.gz

This is the latest version as of this writing (Feb.04.2011).

NOTE: If you’re compiling on a G5 machine you’ll need to tell the compiler that you want to build/configure for a ppc64 target so instead of the below configure command you need to use this:

MACOSX_DEPLOYMENT_TARGET=10.5 CFLAGS=" -arch ppc64 -g -Os -pipe -no-cpp-precomp" CCFLAGS=" -arch ppc64 -g -Os -pipe" CXXFLAGS="-arch ppc64 -g -Os -pipe" LDFLAGS="-arch ppc64 -bind_at_load" ./configure --enable-shared
tar -zxvlf jpegsrc.v8c.tar.gz
cd jpeg-8c/
./configure
make
make test
make -n install

The last command will simulate the installation process. Make sure the stuff is getting installed in /usr/local/lib

make install

At this point you should have a working installation of libjpeg. Now we double check our php version.

server:jpeg-8c root# php -v
PHP 5.2.14 (cli) (built: Oct  6 2010 16:57:10)
Copyright (c) 1997-2010 The PHP Group
Zend Engine v2.2.0, Copyright (c) 1998-2010 Zend Technologies

Notice in the output that I have php 5.2.14 installed on the machine (again the latest update as of Feb.04.2011). Apple does not provide source code for this exact version of PHP. On top of that The numbering scheme that they use is weird. On my machine it is “apache_mod_php-44.6”, you can find yours using the following:

server:jpeg-8c root# php -i |more
phpinfo()
PHP Version => 5.2.14

System => Darwin saturn.rcc.ryerson.ca 9.8.0 Darwin Kernel Version 9.8.0: Wed Ju
l 15 16:55:01 PDT 2009; root:xnu-1228.15.4~1/RELEASE_I386 i386
Build Date => Oct  6 2010 16:55:34
Configure Command =>  '/SourceCache/apache_mod_php/apache_mod_php-44.6/php/confi
gure'  '--prefix=/usr' '--mandir=/usr/share/man' '--infodir=/usr/share/info' '--
disable-dependency-tracking' '--with-apxs2=/usr/sbin/apxs' '--with-ldap=/usr' '-
-with-kerberos=/usr' '--enable-cli' '--with-zlib-dir=/usr' '--enable-trans-sid'
'--with-xml' '--enable-exif' '--enable-ftp' '--enable-mbstring' '--enable-mbrege
x' '--enable-dbx' '--enable-sockets' '--with-iodbc=/usr' '--with-curl=/usr' '--w
ith-config-file-path=/etc' '--sysconfdir=/private/etc' '--with-mysql-sock=/var/m
ysql' '--with-mysqli=/usr/bin/mysql_config' '--with-mysql=/usr' '--with-openssl'
 '--with-xmlrpc' '--with-xsl=/usr' '--without-pear'

The thing you’re looking for (“apache_mod_php-44.6”) is under Configure Command. If you go to the following URL (http://www.opensource.apple.com/source/apache_mod_php/) in your browser (safari, firefox) you’ll soon discover these weird directory names with numbers that don’t match the php versions. Again, as of this writing (Feb.04.2011), I can’t find apache_mod_php-44.6 folder in the listing so I grabbed the nearest numbers apache_mod_php-44.2 which is php 5.2.8…….close enough. It seems to work. Follow the steps below to get the file and compile the GD portion of it. Remember we’re not recompiling the entire php, just the GD plugin portion.

UPDATE: You CAN install the exact version of your PHP’s GD extension. Instead of grabbing the file from Apple, figure out the version of your PHP using “php -v” and grab the appropriate file from php.net instead. I just recompiled the GD portion of PHP 5.2.14, since I wanted a perfect match between my php engine and the extension. The instructions below (except curl which needs to be modified) work.

NOTE: If you’re compiling on a G5 machine you’ll need to tell the compiler that you want to build/configure for a ppc64 target so instead of the below configure command you need to use this:

MACOSX_DEPLOYMENT_TARGET=10.5 CFLAGS=" -arch ppc64 -g -Os -pipe -no-cpp-precomp" CCFLAGS=" -arch ppc64 -g -Os -pipe" CXXFLAGS="-arch ppc64  -g -Os -pipe" LDFLAGS=" -arch ppc64  -bind_at_load" ./configure --with-zlib-dir=/usr --with-jpeg-dir=/usr/local/lib --with-png-dir=/usr/X11R6 --with-freetype-dir=/usr/X11R6 --with-xpm-dir=/usr/X11R6
cd /SourceCache
curl -O http://www.opensource.apple.com/source/apache_mod_php/apache_mod_php-44.2/php-5.2.8.tar.bz2
tar xjvf php-5.2.8.tar.bz2
cd /SourceCache/php-5.2.8/ext/gd
phpize
./configure --with-zlib-dir=/usr --with-jpeg-dir=/usr/local/lib --with-png-dir=/usr/X11R6 --with-freetype- dir=/usr/X11R6 --with-xpm-dir=/usr/X11R6
make
make test
make -n install

The last command will simulate the installation process. Make sure the stuff is getting installed in /usr/lib/php/extensions/no-debug-non-zts-20060613

make install

Now we need to modify our php.ini file and tell the php5 engine of the availability of this new module. To do this you need to copy php.ini.default to php.ini (in /etc directory). For details of why have a look at this article.

cd /etc
cp php.ini.default php.ini

Edit the newly created/copied php.ini using your favourite editor. Add the following line to the appropriate location (read the comments in the file to find the location):

extension=gd.so

Still in the same file find the variable “extension_dir” and change it’s value to “/usr/lib/php/extensions/no-debug-non-zts-20060613” path instead of “./”. Save the php.ini and use the following command to see if GD extensions are available:

server:etc root# php -i |grep GD
GD Support => enabled
GD Version => bundled (2.0.34 compatible)

Done. Restart Apache service from the server manager (just for the sake of completeness).

Optimizing Snow Leopard for SSD drives….

datePosted on 22:13, January 16th, 2011 by Many Ayromlou

I just installed a new 128GB SSD drive in my older C2D 17″ macbook Pro and let me tell you….WOW….This thing is on fire. The system is extremely responsive and apps literally jump onto the screen. The machine now boots up to full desktop in roughly 17 seconds. Now that’s nice. I did do a bunch of changes to the way Snow Leopard is setup to optimize a couple of things that are normally tuned for HDD’s.

  • Turn off Sudden Motion Sensor (SMS): If you are replacing your primary (and only) HDD internal drive with a SSD, you can get a bit of a performance boost by turning off the Sudden Motion Sensor technology that comes with your laptop. Remember your SSD doesn’t use read/write head on rigid platters so there is no reason to keep this feature turned on. You can safely turn it off by issuing the command below in Terminal, type in administrator password when asked.
    sudo pmset -a sms 0
  • Turn off hibernation and delete sleepimage file: Using SSD, you can achieve under 20 seconds boot-up time. Why bother using Hibernation and waste too much space on your SSD. To do so, issue the commands below in Terminal, enter administrator password when asked.
    sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 0
    sudo rm /var/vm/sleepimage
  • Reduce disk I/O by mouting partition with noatime: Stop OSX from updating “last access time” or atime everytime a file is touched on your filesystem. This is IO expensive and unnecessary. In a terminal window create a file called com.nullvision.noatime.plist under /Library/LaunchDaemons folder and stick the following lines in the file. Save the file (you need to sudo when you edit the file) and reboot your machine.
    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
    <!DOCTYPE plist PUBLIC "-//Apple//DTD PLIST 1.0//EN"
            "http://www.apple.com/DTDs/PropertyList-1.0.dtd">
    <plist version="1.0">
        <dict>
            <key>Label</key>
            <string>com.nullvision.noatime</string>
            <key>ProgramArguments</key>
            <array>            
    		<string>mount</string>
                	<string>-vuwo</string>
                	<string>noatime</string>
                	<string>/</string>
            </array>
            <key>RunAtLoad</key>
            <true/>
        </dict>
    </plist>

    Once the machine has rebooted you can check to make sure your root partition is mounted with noatime by issuing the following command

    mount | grep "/"

    and look for something similar to this in the output

    /dev/disk0s3 on / (hfs, local, journaled, noatime)

This should do it. Have fun with your new SSD drive.

Map any network drive to Mac OS X that auto mounts after system reboot

datePosted on 13:34, September 20th, 2010 by Many Ayromlou

Here is a quick recipe for making a network drive auto mount on your OSX machine. This works with pretty much any protocol supported by Finders “Connect to Server” option. Here is how you do it:

  1. From the Finder, hit Command+K or select Connect to Server from the Go menu.
  2. You’ll see the following window, enter the relevant information (ie: the network drive location, be it afp:// or smb:// or http://) and hit Connect button.
  3. Enter your login/password and click “OK
  4. Make sure your Finder Preferences are set so Network Drives are visible on your desktop:
  5. At this point you should have a icon like on your desktop
  6. Now go to System Preferences under the Apple menu
  7. Click on the Accounts icon under System and select Login Items tab (you might have to unlock this panel by clicking the small lock icon on the bottom left of that screen):
  8. Click the “+” sign to add a Login Item to the list and in the following screen go to your Computer icon (on the left under Devices) and select the mounted volume icon from the list on the right and click Add:
  9. You’ll end up with a screen similar to the one below. Click on Show All and exit Preferences. Reboot and make sure it all works.

That’s it…..Enjoy :-)

Reset iTunes 10 window control buttons

datePosted on 15:57, September 2nd, 2010 by Many Ayromlou

Not sure what’s happening lately in the Apple UI design department. Someone over there decided to reposition the window control buttons (you know x,-,+ aka. close,minimize,maximize) vertically in the latest itunes10 (see pics below).

If you prefer the old (proper) way of having them ordered horizontally (see picture above), you can use the commands below:

defaults write com.apple.iTunes full-window -1

If you need to reset it back, you can use the commands below:

defaults write com.apple.iTunes full-window -0

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